Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Why Are Routine Veterinary Visits So Important?

 THE BREGMAN VETERINARY GROUP
www.BregmanVetGroup.com

Preventative care is an important part of keeping your cat happy and healthy.  Routine veterinary visits help to assess your cat’s nutrition and behavior, as well as prevent diseases and parasites.  Since cats age faster than we do, preventative exams are an essential part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle.  Here are a few things we look for during each exam.

Vet Exams Check For:
  • Muscle tone and weight
  • Coat, fur and skin
  • Ears and eyes
  • Mouth, gums and teeth
  • Joints and spine
  • Abdomen and body
We recommend that pet owners bring their cats in for a check-up once a year.  Senior cats may need to schedule visits more frequently.  Contact our office for more information on how to provide your pet with the best possible care, or read this article from the American Association of Feline Practitioners to learn more about why annual exams are so important for cats.

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Thursday, August 21, 2014

Pool Rehab at Reunion Veterinary Hospital

 THE BREGMAN VETERINARY GROUP
www.BregmanVetGroup.com

Mikey is a patient of ours at Reunion Veterinary Hospital.  He herniated a disc in his lumbar spine.  We are treating him with our therapeutic laser and his owner is performing rehab in a pool environment.

Check out the photos from Mikey's rehab below!







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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Meet Our Team: Getting to Know Robin Sturtz

 THE BREGMAN VETERINARY GROUP
www.BregmanVetGroup.com



Meet Robin Sturtz, DVM, Associate Veterinarian at The Cat Hospital in Williston Park! Through this brief interview, we invite you to learn more about Robin Sturtz, DVM, and what makes her so passionate about caring for your pets!



When you were young, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I was born in Brooklyn, and grew up on Long Island.  As a child, I had many ideas about my future. I wanted to be: an astronomer, an astronaut, a foreign language interpreter, and a writer (in that approximate order). I took a college class in speech pathology that I loved, and so I majored in Speech and Hearing.

When did you first decide you wanted to be in the Veterinary field?
My first profession was Audiology. I was a clinical audiologist for twenty years, with a specialty in pediatrics. I enjoyed this profession. However, I became more interested in medicine as I went on, and began to reconsider my career path. This was enhanced by my experiences with a wonderful dog whose considerable medical needs provided a real learning experience.

When I saw that there was a course in veterinary science offered at Mercy College, I decided to take it. What I found was that I loved it, and I took more pre-veterinary courses. Before I knew it, I was applying to veterinary school.

From where did you get your degree? / From where did you receive your training?
I got my DVM degree from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine in 2004 (as well as a Certificate in International Veterinary Medicine). I came back to New York once I graduated, and saw an advertisement for a veterinarian in a feline practice. That ad brought me to the Bregman Veterinary Group, and The Cat Hospital. I’ve been at The Cat Hospital ever since I graduated. I have done some teaching, and have written a textbook on veterinary anatomy and physiology. However, The Cat Hospital has always been where my heart is.

What is your most memorable experience on the job?
In my ten years with the Bregman Veterinary Group, I have had many remarkable experiences. One of my first patients was brought in by her frantic family who thought she had a tumor; the “tumor” turned out to be a knot of hair. It was easily removed, and I had my first cure! Other cases have been more complicated. They have ranged from nursing a very sick eight-week-old kitten back to health, to supporting the family of a twenty two-year-old cat who was terminally ill. The environment of compassion for our clients and our patients is crucial to our practice, and it is tremendously rewarding. The ability to serve, no matter the outcome, is very special.

What do you do for fun?
I am very fortunate to be in a profession I love, surrounded by people who are fantastic to work with. When I do get some free time, I love to read (science fiction, biography, history). I go to the gym every so often. And I am the servant of two cats, Oscar and Kira. (When I come back in the next life, I’m coming back as one of my cats; that’s the lifestyle to which I’d like to become accustomed!)

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Monday, August 18, 2014

Creating a Feline-Friendly Vet Visit

 THE BREGMAN VETERINARY GROUP
www.BregmanVetGroup.com

Is your cat due for a visit to the vet?  Annual exams are an important part of caring for your pet’s health, but many cats find vet visits to be overwhelming.  Here are a few tips to help make your vet visit stress-free for you and your cat.

Cat Vet Tips:
  • Use a Carrier – Cat carriers help your pet feel safe and prevent accidental escapes on the way to the vet.  Make sure your cat is comfortable with the carrier a few days beforehand by leaving treats, toys, and food inside.
  • Keep Carrier Covered – While moving from your home to the vet, keep the carrier covered with a sheet or towel.  This will help your cat feel safe and secure.
  • Provide Treats – If your cat is healthy, offer a treat to help teach your pet that the vet is a positive place to be.
  • Practice – Practice some of the things that your vet will do when you are at home.   Always pair this with something positive to help your cat feel comfortable both at home and when they visit the office for an exam.
  • Visit a Cat-Friendly Vet – Bregman Vet Group offers feline-friendly practices.  Our practices are quiet, peaceful, and stress-free for your pet.
For more tips on how to provide your pet with a stress-free vet visit, check out this article.  You can also visit the Long Island Cat Hospital or 5th Avenue Cat Clinic for feline-friendly veterinary care.  Contact Bregman Vet Group with any questions you have regarding your cat’s health.

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Thursday, August 14, 2014

Preventing and Managing Feline House-Soiling

 THE BREGMAN VETERINARY GROUP
www.BregmanVetGroup.com

Feline house-soiling is one of the most common reasons that cats are abandoned.  However, this problem is often due to a specific physical, social, or medical issue that needs to be addressed.  The American Association of Feline Practitioners provides pet owners with information on how they can prevent, manage, and resolve feline house-soiling.

Causes of House-Soiling
  • Environmental and Social Factors – Some cats may avoid using a litter box that is placed in a high traffic area.  They might feel intimidated by a more dominant cat or they may have had a negative experience when they were near the litter box.
  • Marking Behavior – It is normal for cats to mark their scent.  Unneutered male cats and most unsprayed females will also use urine spraying as part of their sexual behavior.
  • Medical Causes and Problems – If your pet experiences this behavior change, you should bring them to our practice for a physical examination and urinalysis to check for infections, cystitis, arthritis, kidney problems, diabetes, and other medical issues.
  • Feline Idiopathic Cystitis – This medical condition increases the frequency of urination.  It can also cause difficulty and pain when urinating and your pet may have blood in their urine.
Many cats that are abandoned by pet owners due to house-soiling end up in shelters where they are often euthanized.  Although it can be a complicated problem, there are ways to prevent house-soiling. After you determine the cause behind your cat’s behavior problem, you can make the necessary changes to prevent house-soiling in the future.

For more tips on how to prevent, manage, and resolve feline house-soiling, read this brochure produced by the American Association of Feline Practitioners.  You can also contact Bregman Vet Group with any questions you have regarding your pet’s health.

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Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Recognizing the Signs of Asthma

  THE BREGMAN VETERINARY GROUP
www.BregmanVetGroup.com

It’s normal for dogs to pant on hot days or when they feel tired, but pet owners should be aware that asthma can also make breathing difficult in pets.  This allergic reaction triggers inflammation that can narrow or block airways.  We remind pet owners to keep an eye out for clues that may indicate that your pet has asthma.

Asthma Symptoms:
  • Heavy panting
  • Extreme expansion and contraction of chest muscles
  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Loss of energy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Pale or blue gums (in severe cases)
Both cats and dogs are susceptible to asthma.  If you notice that your pet is experiencing any of these symptoms, you should bring your pet into our office for a visit.  We can help you determine the allergen that is causing your pet’s asthma.

For tips on how to create a safe living space for asthmatic pets, check out this article.  You can also contact Bregman Vet Group with any questions you have regarding your pet’s health.

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Thursday, August 7, 2014

Pet Disease Precautions

 THE BREGMAN VETERINARY GROUP
www.BregmanVetGroup.com

Photo Source: Flickr
Love to spend time outdoors with your pets?  We remind outdoor enthusiasts to take disease precautions before heading out doors.  These are a few common pet diseases campers, hikers, and backpackers should be on the lookout for.

Outdoor Diseases:

·        Anaplasmosis – This disease is spread by tick bites.  Symptoms in humans include headaches, fever, chills and muscle aches.  However, for dogs, they may show signs of lameness, joint pain, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing or labored breathing.
·        Babesiosis – This malaria-like disease is caused by a parasite transmitted by ticks.  It is difficult to diagnose in dogs because they may appear normal.  However, some dogs show signs of the sease including fever, lethargy, loss of appetite, and depression.
·        Cryptosporidiosis – This illness is caused by a one-celled parasite found in the stool of wild animals.  Infection tends to occur after your pet comes into contact with contaminated drinking or swimming water or uncooked food.
·        Lyme Disease – This illness is caused by a bacterium found in deer ticks.  Dogs infected with Lyme disease may not show signs for 2-5 months.  Symptoms include fever, loss of appetite, and lameness.

To learn more about diseases and precautions outdoor enthusiasts should take on the American Veterinary Medical Association website.  You can also contact Bregman Vet Group with any questions you have regarding your pet’s health.  Visit our office if you suspect that your pet is exhibiting any signs of illness!